For three decades, a man who fraudulently claimed to be Prince Sultan Bin Khalid Al-Saud of Saudi Arabia lived a lavish life fueled by Rolex watches, Ferrari sports cars and designer clothing – but the veil used to conceal his real identity slipped on Friday when he was sentenced to 18 years in prison.

His real name is Anthony Gignac, a 48-year-old Miami con man with a mixed personality disorder who was born in Bogota, Columbia – not Saudi Arabia as he so regularly claimed.

Prosecutors say that Gignac has been arrested at least 11 times over the past 30 years for impersonating Saudi royalty, spending much of his time in and out of prison.

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Gignac adopted several different aliases across the 30 years but the most part of his criminal enterprising, Gignac impersonated Prince Khalid, who in real-life is the 79-year-old governor of Mecca.

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Anthony Gignac (pictured), a 48-year-old Miami con man, was sentenced to 18.5 years in prison on Friday for impersonating Saudi royalty to fraudulently obtain $8.1 million
14249950 7094991 Prior to his final arrest in late 2017 Gignac lived a life of pr a 8 1559442533537 - Fake sheikh who pretended to be a Saudi Prince jailed
Prior to his final arrest in late 2017, Gignac lived a life of profound wealth, driving a red Ferrari, donning Cartier bracelets worth tens-of-thousands of dollars and leasing an exclusive penthouse apartment in Miami – with many of his extravagant trappings documented on his Instagram ‘@PrinceDubai_07’
14249902 7094991 Gignac would also flaunt massive stacks of cash on his social me a 9 1559442533538 - Fake sheikh who pretended to be a Saudi Prince jailed
Gignac would also flaunt massive stacks of cash on his social media, with one post captioned: ‘Birthday gifts from my fam’ showing at least $70,000 with two diamond encrusted watches hanging over the wads.
4799600 7094991 At the time of the con Soffer had just announced his divorce fro a 66 1559445982341 - Fake sheikh who pretended to be a Saudi Prince jailed
Gignac also attempted to dupe billionaire hotel owner and Elle MacPherson’s ex-husband, Jeffrey Soffer, out of hundreds-of-thousands of dollars with a fake business proposition

But on Friday, the long-running act came to a sensational end when a Miami federal court judge sentenced him to 18-and-a-half years in prison for defrauding dozens of investors – ranging from South Florida to England – in elaborate schemes where he posed as Saudi royalty looking for substantial investment projects.

Gignac also attempted to dupe billionaire hotel owner and Elle MacPherson’s ex-husband, Jeffrey Soffer, out of hundreds-of-thousands of dollars with a fake business proposition.

He admitted responsibility to the judge for illegally fleecing in excess of $8.1 million from his 26 unsuspecting victims, but he insisted ‘I’m not a monster’.

Attempting to mitigate his sentence, Gignac revealed to the court that he suffers from a number of mental health problems stemming from an abusive childhood both in Bogota and with his adoptive family in Michigan.

He insisted he wasn’t the lone mastermind of the operation, claiming to have worked among a racket of criminals who collaborated with him in the devious schemes.

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14249934 7094991 Gignac handed out business cards that referred to himself as pri a 14 1559442533647 - Fake sheikh who pretended to be a Saudi Prince jailed
Gignac handed out business cards that referred to himself as ‘prince,’ ‘his royal highness’ and ‘sultan’ (pictured: Gignac’s alleged collection of car keys)

Gignac declared there were ‘other people’ who should’ve been standing alongside him in the dock.

US District Judge Cecilia Altonaga called Gignac’s criminal resume ‘truly remarkable’.

‘He was the mastermind,’ Altonaga declared, according to the Miami Herald. ‘He was the so-called Saudi prince. He enveloped himself in the trappings of Saudi royalty. He had everyone believing he was a Saudi Prince.’

Prior to his final arrest in late 2017, Gignac lived a life of profound wealth, driving a red Ferrari, donning Cartier bracelets worth tens-of-thousands of dollars and leasing an exclusive penthouse apartment in Miami – with many of his extravagant trappings documented on his Instagram ‘@PrinceDubai_07’

Many of his posts show his diamond embellished fingertips caressing the steering wheels of various sports cars. Others show his beloved Chihuahua Foxy sitting in her Louis Vuitton carrier case dressed in designer clothing.

In one video, Foxy is pictured wearing a gold, diamond-encrusted collar as he sits on a boat with friends of Gignac.

In another, the pup is seen laying on the couch in what Gignac claims is a Hermes collar.

During the same video, the Michigan-raised man shows off a four bracelets which appear to be Cartier.

The most expensive is $40,100.

Gignac would also flaunt massive stacks of cash on his social media, with one post captioned: ‘Birthday gifts from my fam’ showing at least $70,000 with two diamond-encrusted watches hanging over the wads.

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He bought fake diplomatic license plates for his cars and fake Diplomatic Security Service badges for his bodyguards, prosecutors said.

When he wasn’t flaunting his cash, Gignac was showing off his black American Express card.

The card made it to flash dinners, shopping sprees with Foxy, and was almost always fighting a giant diamond ring to be the focus of the photo.

Gignac may not have been a royal, but the victims of his elaborate scheme cannot be judged too harshly. In addition to his private plane, boat and flashy jewelry, the faux prince had a huge collection of luxury cars.

Social media posts show the pretend royal behind the wheel of a Bentley, a Rolls Royce, a BMW and a Maserati.

In a particularly boastful picture, the steering wheel of a Lamborghini was covered in Saudi Riyals and positioned behind a diplomatic passport.

He handed out business cards that referred to himself as ‘prince,’ ‘his royal highness’ and ‘sultan.’ When he met with investors, he demanded expensive gifts as part of ‘royal protocol’.

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